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IS 13727 (1993) : Guide for requirements of cluster planning 
for housing [CED 51: Planning^ Housing and pre-f abricated 
construction] 




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IS 13727 : 1993 
Reaffirmed 2009 



Indian Standard 

REQUIREMENTS OF CLUSTER PLANNING 
FOR HOUSING — GUIDE 



UDC 721-011-22: 69-032-2 



© BIS 1993 

BUREAU OF INDIAN STANDARDS 

MANAK BHAVAN, 9 BAHADUR SHAH ZAFAR MARG 
NEW DELHI 110002 

July 1993 Price Group 3 



AMENDMENT NO. 1 AUGUST 1994 
TO 
IS 13727 : 1993 REQUIREMENTS OF CLUSTER 
PLANNING FOR HOUSING — GUIDE 

( Forward ) — Add the following after para 4: 

'Cluster planning is one of the better options available which provide appropriate 
physical spaces that are conducive to community life and development. 
Wherever such planning is adopted, this should be regulated by the standards 
recommended here.* 

( Page 3, clause 4.4 ) — Modify the last sentence as follows: 

'Maximum cluster courtyard width and breadth shall be 13 m.' 

( Page 3, clause 4.6 ) — Modify the second sentence as follows: 

'While bridging the pedestrian pathway minimum clearance should be one storey 
height.' 



(CED51) 



Reprography Unit, BIS, New Delhi, India 



Housing Sectional Committee, CED 51 



FOREWORD 

This Indian Standard was adopted by the Bureau of Indian Standards, after the draft finalized by the 
Housing Sectional Committee had been approved by the Civil Engineering Division Council, 

Cluster planning is recognised to be consistent with traditional Indian life style. This has also been an 
accepted traditional practice all over the world. In the recent years, however cluster planning has been 
largely neglected. The traditional changes of the modern age which made people more individualistic 
and self-centred, the large city anonimity, the loosening of fkmily and community ties, the advent of 
the automobile and the desire to bring it almost in the house, tended to make cluster planning 
irrelevant. 

In the recent years, there has been an upsurge of projects to resettle slum dwellers and provide housing 
for the urban poor. Several studies have been carried out of spontaneously developed settlements. We 
have now rediscovered the virtues of low rise high density development in the context of affordabiltty 
and incremental growth. There have been number of innovative projects being developed. The cluster 
concept has been accepted now as economic necessity and desirable socially to promote desired life 
style. 

Cluster planning has proved to be a powerful urban design tool, yet number of conventional byelaw 
provisions such as set back and coverage hinder efficient planning based on cluster concept. It has, 
therefore become necessary to devise guidelines that will permit imaginative cluster planning. 

The composition of the committee responsible for the formulation of this standard is given in 
Annex A. 



IS 13727 : 1993 



Indian Standard 

REQUIREMENTS OF CLUSTER PLANNING 
FOR HOUSING -GUIDE 



1 SCOPE 

1.1 This standard provides guidelines for the 
planning and building requirements of housing 
developed as clusters. 

1.2 Provision of the guidelines are applicable 
to all housing projects taken up by public, 
private or co-operative agencies. 

2 REFERENCES 

2.1 The following Indian Standards are 
necessary adjuncts to this standard: 

IS No, Title 

SP 7 : 1983 National building code of India 
{first revision ) 

8888 Guide for requirements of low 

(Part 1): 1993 income housing Part 1 Urban 
area 

3 TERMINOLOGY 

3.0 For the purpose of this standard the 
following definitions shall apply: 

3.1 Cluster 

Plots or dwelling units or housing grouped 
around an open space. Ideally housing cluster 
should not be very large. In ground and one 
storeycd structures not more than 20 houses 
should be grouped in a cluster. Clusters with 
more dwelling units will create problems in 



identity, encroachments and of maintenance 
( see Fig. 1 ). 

rGROUP OPEN 
, SPACE IN A CLUSTER 







5 


9 


8 


7 


6 


n 






5 


12 


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3 


15 




17 


18 




2 


16 


1 



Fig. 1 Cluster 

3.2 Group Housing 

Group or multi-storeyed housing for more than 
one dwelling unit, where land is owned jointly 
( as in case of co-operative societies or the 
public agencies, such as local authorities or 
housing boards, etc ) and the construction is 
undertaken by one agency/authority ( see 
Fig. 2 ). 

3.3 Cluster Plot 

Plot in a cluster as defined at 3.1 will be called 
cluster plot. 

3.4 Group Open Space 

Open space within a cluster is neither public 
open space nor private open space. Each 





ground floor first floor 

Fig. 2 Cluster Group Housing 



1 



IS 13727 : 19f3 



dwelling unit around the cluster open space will 
have a share and right of use in it. The respon- 
sibility for maintenance of the same will be 
collectively shared by all the dwelling units 
around. This space will be called as group open 
space. 

3.5 Cluster Court Town House 

A dwelling in a cluster plot having 100 percent 
or nearly 100 percent ground coverage with 
vertical expansion, generally limited to one 
floor only and meant for self use, will be called 
Cluster Court Town House ( see Fig. 3 ). 





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1 
1 






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Fig. 3 Cluster Court Town House 

3.6 DenaHy 

The residential density is expressed in terms of 
number of dwelling units per hectare. 

3.7 Net Density 

Where such densities are expressed exclusive of 
community facilities and open spaces provision 
and major roads ( including incidental open 
spaces ), there will be net residential densities. 
Where these densities are expressed taking into 
consideration the required open space provision 
and community facilities and major roads, these 
would be gross residential densities on neigh- 
bourhood level, sector level or town level, 
as the case may be. The provision of open 
spaces and community facilities will depend on 
the size of the residential community. 

Incidential open spaces are mainly open spaces 
required to be left around and in between two 
buildings to provide light and ventilation. 



3.8 Independent Cluster 

Clusters as defined at 3.1, will be considered ati 
independent clusters when surrounded from all 
sides by vehicular access roads and/or 
pedestrian paths ( see Fig. 4 ). 




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Fig. 4 Independent Cluster 

3.9 Back to Back Cluster 

Clusters when joined back to back and/or on 
sides will be considered as 'back to back 
clusters* ( see Fig. 5 ). 




Fig. 5 Back to Back Cluster 

3.10 Interlocking Cluster 

Clusters when joined at back and on sides with 
at least one side of a cluster common and having 
some dwelling units opening onto or having 
access from the adjacent clusters will be consi- 
dered as interlocking clusters. Dwelling units in 
such clusters should have at least two sides 
open to external open space. Houses in an 
interlocking cluster can have access, ventilation 
and light from the adjacent and cluster and 
should also cater for future growth ( see 
Fig. 6). 




Fig, 6 Interlocking Cluster 



IS 13727 : 1993 



3.11 'Cul-de-Sac' Cluster 



4 PLANNING 



Plots/dwelling units when located along a 4.1 Plot Size 
pedestrianised or vehicular * cul-de-sac* road will 
be considered as ^cul-de-sac" cluster ( 5ee Fig. 7 ). 




Fig. 7 Cul-Djs-Sac Clusier 
3.12 Closed Clusters 

<Jlusters with only one common entry into 
cluster open space ( see Fig. 8 ) 




ra 



Fig. 



ONE COMMON ENTRY 
8 Closed Cluster 



■ 



3.13 Open Clusters 

Cluster where cluster open spaces are linked to 
form a continuous open space can be considered 
as open cluster ( see Fig. 9 ). 





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Fig. 9 Open Cluster 
3.14 External and Internal Faces of Cluster 

Building edges facing the cluster open spaces 
will be called inner faces of cluster and building 
edges facing the adjacent cluster open space 
( as in case of interlocking cluster) of the 
surrounding pedestrian paths or vehicular access 
roads will be called as external faces of cluster. 



The minimum plot size permissible shall be 
15 m* with 100 percent ground coverage and an 
FSI of two. 100 percent ground coverage and 
FSI of 2 will be applicable up to plot size of 
25 m«. For plot sizes beyond 25 m^ provision of 
IS 8888 (Part 1 ) : 1993 will be applicable. 



4.2 Plot/Plinth 
Same Site 



Area for Slum Resettlement on 



In case of slum resettlement on the same site, 
minimum area may be reduced to 1 2*5 m« with 
potential for adding another 12-5 m« on first 
floor with an internal staircase. 

4.3 Group Housing 

Group housing can be permitted within cluster 
housing concept. However, dwelling units with 
plinth areas up to 20 m« should have scope for 
adding a habitable room. Group housing in a 
cluster should not be more than 15 m in height. 

4.4 Size of Cluster Open Space 

Minimum dimensions of open spaces shall be 
not less than 6 m or 3/4th of ihc height of 
buildings along the cluster open space, which- 
ever is higher. The area of such cluster court 
shall not be less than 36 m». Group housing 
around a cluster open space should not be 
normally more than Ibm in height. Maximum 
cluster width and breadth can be 13 m. 

4.5 Setbacks 

No setbacks are needed from the edges of 
cluster as pedestrian/vehicular access roads 
surrounding the cluster. 

4.6 Right to Build in Sky 

Pedestrian paths and vehicular access roads to 
clusters separting two adjacent clusters can be 
bridged to provide additional dewelling units. 
While bridging the pedestrian path minimum 
clearance should be 2 storey height, length of 
such bridging should be not more than two 
dwelling units. While bridging the vehicular 
access roads minimum clearance should bo 6 m. 

4.7 Vehicular Access 

A right of way of at least 6 m width should be 
provided up to the entrance to the cluster to 
facilitate emergency vehicle movement up to 
cluster. 



4.8 Pedestrian Paths 

Minimum width of pedestrian paths 
be 3 m. 



shall 



IS 13727 : 1993 



4.9 Width of Access Between Two Clusters 

Built area of dwelling unit within cluster shall 
have no setbacks from the path or road, space. 
Hence, the height of the builiding along the 
pathway or roads shall be not less than 60 per- 
cent of the height of the adjacent building 
subject to minimum of 3 m in case of pathway 
and 6 m in case of vehicular access. 

4.10 Density 

Cluster planning methodologies result in higher 
densities with low rise structures. With per 
dwelling unit covered area of 15 m^ densities of 
500 dwelling units per hect. (net) shall be 
permissible. Densities higher than this should not 
be allowed. 

4.11 Group Toilet 

Chtster housing for economically weaker section 
families can have group toilets at the rate of one 



WC, one bath and a washing place for three 
families. These shall not be community toilets, 
as keys to these toilets shall be only with these 
three families, making them solely responsible 
for the maintenance and upkeep of these toilets. 



5 OTHER REQUIREMENTS 

5.1 Requirements of Building Design 

With the exception of clauses mentioned above, 
requirements of building will be governed by the 
provision of National Building Code 1980 and 
IS 8888 ( Part 1 ) : 1993. 



5,2 Requirements of fire safety, structural 
design, building services and plumbing set vices 
shall be as specified in SP 7 ; 1983. 



IS 13727 : 1995 



. Chairman 
Dr p. S. a. Sundabam 

Mimbers 

Shki Abombb Rkvi 
Pbof H. p. Babri 

Prop Scbib Saha ( Alternatt ) 

SlIBlH. U. BiJLANI 



ANNEX A 
( Foreword ) 

Housing Sectional Committee, CED 51 

Reprtsenting 
Ministry of Urban Development, New Delhi 



Development Alternatives, New Delhi 
School of Planning and Architect, New Delhi 



Chief Auchitkct 

Skniob Abghitect ( H & TP ) I ( AUtrnaU ) 
Chibf Emoikbbb, Authority 

Architect, Authority ( AlUrnatt ) 
Chief Enoiheer ( D ) 

Superi«tenpino Enoinkbb ( AltirnaU ) 
EMaiHEEBlNO Mbmber, DDA 
Shri B. B. Gabo 
Shri Y. K. Garo 

Shbi Chbtan Vaidya ( AU$rnati ) 
Shri O. P. Gabyalx 

Ob N. K. JaiK ( Alttrnate ) 
Shbi T. N. Gufta 
Shbi Habbindbb Sinqh 

Shri R. N. Agorawal ( AlUrnaU ) 
Shri N, N. Javdbkar 

Shri P. M. Dbshpandb ( AlUrnat$) 
Shri M. N. Joolbkab 

Shbi S. K. Tanbja ( AlUrnaU ) 
Shbi T. P. Kamappan 

Shri J. Bhuvanbbwaran { AlUrnaU ) 
Miss Nina Kapoor 
Shri A. K. M. Kabiw 
Shbi K. R.S. Kbishnai^ 
Brio N. Kumar 

Shri K. M. Nambiar ( AlUrnaU ) 
Shri Raja Singh 

Shri S. Selvanthan ( AlUrnat€ ) 
Dr a. G. Madhava Rao 

Shri I. K. Mani { Alternate ) 
ShbiU. N. Rath 

Cor. D. V. Padsalgikar ( Alternate ) 
Shri K. S. Shiniwasan 

Shrt M. M. Mistry ( AlUrnate ) 
Shki Y. R. Tankja, 

Director-in-Charge ( Civ Engg ) 



In personal capacity ( 1 Sadhna Enclave, Panchs\eel Park, New 

Delhi-17 ) 
Central Public Works Department, New Delhi 

Maharashtra Housing and Area Development Authority, Bombay 

Central Public Works Department, New Delhi 

Delhi Development Authority, New Delhi 
Central Building Research institute, Roorkee 
National Housing BanV, Now Delhi 

National Council for Cement and Building Materials, New Delhi 

Building Materials and Technology Promotion Council, New Delhi 
Public Works Department, Government of Rajasthan, Jaipur 

CIDCO of Maharashtra Ltd, New Bombay 

Plousing and Urban Development Corporation, New Delhi 

Tamil Nadu Slum Clearance Board, Madras 

The Mud Village Society, New Delhi 
Housing Department, Government of Moghalaya, Sbiilong 
Department of Science and Technology ( DST ), New Delhi 
Engineer-in-Chief*s Branch 

Indian Railway Construction Co Ltd, \ew Delhi 

Structural Engineering Research Centre, Madras 

n. G. Shirke & Co, Pune 

National Buildings Organization, New Qelbi 

Director General, BIS ( Ex-efficio Member ) 



Secretary 

SniiiJ. K. Prasad 
Joint Director ( Civ Engg ), BIS 



Panel for Guide for Requirements of Low Income Housing, CED 51 ; P3 



Convener 

Shbi M. N. Joolkkar 

Members 

Shbi D. P. Singh ( Alternate to 

Shbi M. N. Joglekar ) 
ShbiB.B. Garg 
SbbxY. K. Garg 
Shbi K, T. Gurumukhi 
Shbi T. N. Gupta 
Shbi M. M. Mistby 
Sufbrintbnding Ehoikebh ( Designs ) 

ExBOUTivB Enginbbh ( HQ,) ( Alternate ) 
Shbi Yatin Panrya 



Housing and Urban Development Corporation, New Delhi 



Central Building Research Institute, Roorkce 

National Hpusing Bank, New Delhi 

Town and Country Planning Organization, New Delhi 

Building Materials Technology Promotion Council, New Delhi 

National Buildings Organization, New Delhi 

\'astu-shilpa Foundation, Ahmadabad 

Central Public Works Department, New Delhi 



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Doc:No, CED51 (4953) 

Amendments Issned Since Pnbiieation 

Amend No. Date of Issue Text Affected 



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